Recipe: Burmese Vegetable Samosas

Recipe: Burmese Vegetable Samosa

Burmese vegetable samosas are a type of savory pastry from Myanmar, filled with a mixture of vegetables and spices. They are smaller than the more widely known Indian samosas, have fewer ingredients and are less spicy. Furthermore, they are almost always vegetarian in Myanmar. but often feature distinct flavors and ingredients typical of Burmese cuisine.

Burmese samosas are often served as a snack or appetizer, sometimes with a side of chutney or sauce for dipping. They are a popular street food in Myanmar and can also be found in Burmese restaurants worldwide, served with different kinds of dipping sauce. Many people eat samosa for breakfast in the morning, along with a cup of coffee or tea.

Recipe by Chef Nge-Nge, Tea Garden Restaurant at Borderline Collective in Mae Sot.

Read more about Borderline Collective

Notes by Chef Nge-Nge

This recipe is made with boiled potatoes, but you can also use raw potatoes. If you’re using raw potatoes, you sauté the diced potatoes, onion and spices in a little oil for a couple of minutes, until they are soft and ready to be used as filling.

Samosas are delicious when served piping hot, but you can use leftover samosas the following day for a delicious samosa salad.

At Tea Garden we sometimes make the samosa wraps ourselves, or we go to the market and buy fresh made samosa wraps from a shop. You can find samosa wraps ready for use in most Asian supermarkets.

Recipe: Burmese Vegetable Samosa

Recipe by Chef Nge-Nge – Tea Garden in Mae Sot
Course: Appetizers u0026amp; Snacks, RecipesCuisine: Samosa, snacks
Servings

10

samosas

Burmese samosas are often served as a snack or appetizer, sometimes with a side of chutney or sauce for dipping. They are a popular street food in Myanmar and can also be found in Burmese restaurants worldwide, served with different kinds of dipping sauce. Many people eat samosa for breakfast in the morning, along with a cup of coffee or tea.

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Ingredients

  • 10 pcs 4″ x 2″ samosa wraps

  • 3 boiled potatoes (~1 ½ – 2 cups, diced)

  • 3 small red onions (~ ½ cup, diced)

  • 1 teaspoon paprika

  • 2 teaspoons Indian masala (Garam masala or whichever masala blend you prefer)

  • ½ teaspoon sugar

  • ½ teaspoon salt

  • 2 tablespoons flour

  • 1-2 tablespoons water

  • Oil for frying

Directions

  • Dice the potatoes and the onions.
  • Mix with paprika, masala, sugar and salt.
  • Prepare the samosa wraps if needed. Cut or fold to get 2″ x 4″ rectangular sheets. (most store-bought wraps already have the right shape and dimensions.
  • Make a paste, samosa glue, from flour and water.
  • Form a triangle “cup” with the samosa wrap (see video), using the samosa glue to keep it together. Fill with the potatoes and onions, and seal with samosa glue.
  • Deep fry in vegetable oil until golden and crispy.
  • Serve piping hot with your favorit dipping sauce.

Recipe Video

Borderline Collective in Mae Sot, Thailand

Borderline Collective is located in Mae Sot, which is about the closest you get to Myanmar, while still being on the Thai side of the border. The shop/restaurant/art gallery/creative space was started with the purpose of supporting migrant and refugee women from Myanmar, by helping the women sell their handmade products. The women are organized in smaller, autonomous, collectives based in the small villages along the border, and Borderline Collective provides a space for the women to showcase their products, and thus reach a larger customer base.

Read more about Borderline Collective >>

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Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get an email from me every Sunday with travel inspiration, recipes, and news from the shop.

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Borderline Collective in Mae Sot, Thailand

Borderline Collective is located in Mae Sot, which is about the closest you get to Myanmar, while still being on the Thai side of the border. The shop/restaurant/art gallery/creative space was started with the purpose of supporting migrant and refugee women from Myanmar, by helping the women sell their handmade products. The women are organized in smaller, autonomous, collectives based in the small villages along the border, and Borderline Collective provides a space for the women to showcase their products, and thus reach a larger customer base.

Read more about Borderline Collective >>

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