Recipe: Burmese Potato dumplings (aloo ket tha late kyaw)

Recipe: Burmese Potato dumplings (aloo ket tha late kyaw)

The potato dumplings (aloo ket tha late kyaw) are a popular snack in Myanmar. Traditionally, they were enjoyed in the afternoon, often paired with milk tea, and housewives would enjoy the dumplings during their afternoon gatherings, where they shared stories before going home to cook dinner.
There’s an ongoing discussion about the origins of the beloved potato dumplings. Some suggest that they were introduced from India, as evidenced by the use of masala in certain versions. Other people believe the dumplings originated from China, because they are often eaten with soy sauce as a dipping sauce. The town of Heho in the southern Shan State is notable for its potato cultivation, benefiting from nutrient-rich black soil. However, potato farming is also widespread in other parts of Myanmar.

Recipe and notes by Chef Nge-Nge, Tea Garden restaurant at Borderline Collective in Mae Sot.

Notes

Chef Nge-Nge: Tea Garden is a vegetarian restaurant, so we use tofu as a filling in this recipe, though at home, I would use pork and maybe cheese for the filling.

About Borderline Collective in Mae Sot, Thailand

Borderline Collective is located in Mae Sot, which is about the closest you get to Myanmar, while still being on the Thai side of the border. The shop/restaurant/art gallery/creative space was started with the purpose of supporting migrant and refugee women from Myanmar, by helping the women sell their handmade products. The women are organized in smaller, autonomous, collectives based in the small villages along the border, and Borderline Collective provides a space for the women to showcase their products, and thus reach a larger customer base.

Read more about Borderline Collective >>

Shop the vegetarian cookbook from Tea Garden, Borderline Collective here >>

Recipe: Burmese Potato dumplings (aloo ket tha late kyaw)

Recipe by Mitzie Mee – Sanne
Servings

4

servings

The potato dumplings are a favored morning snack among the Chinese community in Myanmar. Traditionally, they were also a popular afternoon snack, often paired with milk tea. Housewives would enjoy these dumplings during their afternoon gatherings, where they shared stories before going home to cook dinner.

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Ingredients

  • ¼ cup tofu, chopped

  • 1 hard-boiled egg, chopped

  • 1 small red onion, chopped

  • 1 small piece of cabbage (around ¼ cup), chopped

  • 3 stalks spring onion, chopped

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce or savory mushroom sauce

  • ½ teaspoon sugar

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil

  • 5 medium-size potatoes, boiled and peeled.

  • A pinch of salt

  • 2-3 cups flour

  • 1 raw egg

  • Oil for frying.

Directions

  • Mash the potatoes until they are smooth and sticky. Set aside.
  • Mix egg, onion, spring onion, tofu, cabbage, soy sauce, sugar, and oil.
  • Stir fry briefly.
  • The mashed potatoes are very sticky, so apply plenty of flour to your hands. Form a ball that is approximately 1 ½ inches in diameter and flatten it somewhat. This disc will be the upper part of the dumpling.
  • Make another disc of mashed potato and form it into a cup. Fill the cup with the stir-fried mixture. Then place the other flat disc on top. Pinch the top and bottom part together and carefully smooth it into a ball. Check thoroughly for holes, so the dumplings won’t leak when frying.
  • Heat the oil. While it heats up, whisk the raw egg with a fork.
  • Dip the dumplings in the egg and then carefully place the dumplings in the hot oil with a spoon and deep fry until golden and crispy on the outside.
  • Serve hot with chilisauce, soy sauce or lime & ginger sauce.

Recipe Video

Borderline Collective in Mae Sot, Thailand

Borderline Collective is located in Mae Sot, which is about the closest you get to Myanmar, while still being on the Thai side of the border. The shop/restaurant/art gallery/creative space was started with the purpose of supporting migrant and refugee women from Myanmar, by helping the women sell their handmade products. The women are organized in smaller, autonomous, collectives based in the small villages along the border, and Borderline Collective provides a space for the women to showcase their products, and thus reach a larger customer base.

Read more about Borderline Collective >>

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Sign up for my weekly newsletter and get an email from me every Sunday with travel inspiration, recipes, and news from the shop.

I don’t spam! Read my privacy policy for more info.

Borderline Collective in Mae Sot, Thailand

Borderline Collective is located in Mae Sot, which is about the closest you get to Myanmar, while still being on the Thai side of the border. The shop/restaurant/art gallery/creative space was started with the purpose of supporting migrant and refugee women from Myanmar, by helping the women sell their handmade products. The women are organized in smaller, autonomous, collectives based in the small villages along the border, and Borderline Collective provides a space for the women to showcase their products, and thus reach a larger customer base.

Read more about Borderline Collective >>

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